Category Archives: Sickle Cell Disease

Sickle cell anemia is the most common form of sickle cell disease (SCD). SCD is a serious disorder in which the body makes sickle-shaped red blood cells. “Sickle-shaped” means that the red blood cells are shaped like a crescent.

Normal red blood cells are disc-shaped and look like doughnuts without holes in the center. They move easily through your blood vessels. Red blood cells contain an iron-rich protein called hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin). This protein carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.

Sickle cells contain abnormal hemoglobin called sickle hemoglobin or hemoglobin S. Sickle hemoglobin causes the cells to develop a sickle, or crescent, shape.

Sickle cells are stiff and sticky. They tend to block blood flow in the blood vessels of the limbs and organs. Blocked blood flow can cause pain and organ damage. It can also raise the risk for infection.

New Small Business Grant from NIH Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Phoenicia scientists were recently awarded a Phase 2 Small Business Grant from the NIH NHLBI (“Development of a Clinical Hemoglobin Modulator” R42 HL-110727-02) to support clinical development of PB-04, the lead drug candidate for the treatment of β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease

Refractory Wound Therapeutic NIH Grant

NIH grant to convert a potent IV
therapy for refractory wounds into
a topical formulation

Phoenicia has received a new small business grant from the National Institutes of Health for studies to convert an intravenous therapy which healed refractory, disabling leg ulcers in hemolytic anemias, sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, into a topical preparation which can be used readily by patients world-wide. Continue reading